What Table Height Do You Need? An Easy Reference Guide

Are you curious about the average table height? You’ve come to the right place.

By Tina Jepson

 

Did you know that coffee tables sit only about a foot-and-a-half off the ground and that bar counters are 6 to 8 inches higher than traditional kitchen counters? There’s a lot a homeowner needs to know when it comes to the question "What is the standard table height?" The answer is not so simple. 

 

In fact, depending on the type of table you need, the average table height may vary significantly. Since you don’t want to end up with bar-height stools shorter than your traditional dining table or vice versa, it’s important to understand these standard table heights.

 

Use this reference guide of the average table and chair heights as you shop for tables to use around your home.

 

view

 

Kitchen and Dining Tables

Kitchen tables and dining room tables are designed to accommodate dining chairs and people of average heights. Since the standard chair seat height is 18 to 20 inches above the ground, the table needs to be high enough to comfortably fit a person’s legs and lap.

 

view

 

The average kitchen table height is 30 inches.

 

Keep this height in mind when purchasing chairs and high chairs/boosters for children. And, whatever you do, remember that kitchen-height tables and chairs are not the same as counter-height tables and chairs, which average 4 to 6 inches taller.

 

Also, pay attention to the size of any chair arms. A chair should be able to comfortably slide under the table, arms and all.

 

view

 

As you can see, the standard dining chair height is just as important as the table height!

 

Bar Tables

Bar counters and tables are growing more common in homes. Although they were often found in dens and bar areas in years past, today, many homeowners choose bar-height tables and chairs in kitchen and dining areas. Bar stools are usually 26 to 30 inches from floor to seat.

 

The average height of a bar counter/table is 40 inches.

 

view

 

Both traditional chairs with backs and stools work equally as well under a bar table. What makes bar tables unique is their modern appeal. Many contemporary homes feature at least one bar table.

 

Coffee and End Tables

The size, including both length and width, of coffee and end tables for living areas, depends entirely on the seating in said room. Taller couches with plush cushions require a taller setup than a more streamlined, modern seat.

 

A coffee table, which usually sits in front of the main sitting area/couch, should be just as high as the seats of your couch. Any lower, and you and your guests will have to sit up and reach down to access the table.

 

view

 

The average height of a coffee table is around 16 to 18 inches.

 

Standard end table heights are slightly taller than coffee tables. To ensure they’re accessible for beverages, books, and anything else you’d like to store, the table should be about equal to your sofa or chairs’ arm.

 

view

 

The average height of an end table is 22 to 26 inches.

 

Nightstands

Just like the end table, nightstand height should mirror that of your mattress. If you have a low-lying platform bed, look for a nightstand that sits lower. On the other hand, a larger mattress with memory foam and other comfort features will most likely require a taller table.

 

view

 

The average height of a nightstand is between 21 to 28 inches.

 

Entry, Buffet, and Other Tables

For other various tables around your home, there’s a general rule of thumb to follow to ensure your table sits at the right height. First, adults should be able to reach the top of the table without reaching up or down too low.

 

The average height of entry tables, buffet tables, console tables, and other miscellaneous tables ranges from 28 to 34 inches.

 

view

 

Regardless of what type of table you need, consider the height of your furniture AND your family. Don’t forget to keep a tape measure handy and measure, not once, but twice before you settle on a new table for your home.

 

Images used with permission, courtesy of Tina Jepson and www.shutterstock.com

Next: The Art of Throw Pillows