How to Update your Home’s Interior for Winter Showings

Great tips to help sell your home in the winter months.

By Jane McCullough

 

So, you’ve repainted, repaired and cleared clutter – what else can you do to help sell your house in the winter?

 

In spring and summer, the weather and sunshine make even modest homes seem attractive, but the shorter, darker days of winter can work against you when selling. Here are a few tips that can help accent the positive aspects of your home even when in the cold days of winter.

 

Think Light and Bright

Though you may have selected an excellent interior pallet for your home, without natural light to give it that cheering boost, even the best color selection can look gloomy. Without hiring an expensive decorator to redo the entire home, try these tips:

 

Review your Window Coverings

Often, even when we update the paint, we keep the window coverings we have had for years. However, when we live in a home for a long time, window coverings tend to do more than decorate a space.

 

  • We use them to preserve the furniture from the harsh summer rays.
  • We use them to keep in the heat in the winter.
  • We use them to create a quiet, dark sleeping space for the children.

 

These practical reasons that drive many window covering purchases may not be the most effective way of displaying your home in winter. In winter more than ever we need to invite as much natural brightness into the home as possible. There are brilliant winter days that, though cold, can help show the many attributes of your home.

 

Winter from window
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Replacement Ideas

Think of replacing those heavy, lined curtains with light, gauzy, filmy ones that are translucent, not transparent. They let the light in while maintaining privacy and are available for reasonable prices.

 

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Use Valances Alone

Many of us combine valances with curtains for a finished look. However, particularly on the second floor and in the non-street-facing side of the house, interesting valances enable light to enter, adding a natural magnification to the dimensions.

 

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Blinds

Blinds are very useful, and homeowners employ them in every room in the house. They also tend to be difficult to maintain in pristine condition – they collect dust and spider webs and even when completely opened tend to look less tidy than is ideal. Consider replacing them with valances, sheers or adding some floral or other type of decoration to draw attention to the light.

 

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Now that you’ve looked up, look down – do you have old runners or small rugs you use in the winter to preserve the cleanliness of the home? Don’t get rid of them, but store them away when the house is being shown. We all adjust to making room for such necessities in the winter so much so that we don’t see them anymore, but new eyes will see everything, so this small adjustment adds to your home’s appeal.

 

Throw Pillows

Even if they are a good match for your furniture, they may not be current in style terms. Consider replacing them with fresh, stylish throw pillows. Check out discounters such as TJ Maxx which sell only the most current, fashionable home goods. They may not be to your taste exactly, but they will look attractive, modern and puffy.

 

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Remove Evidence of Winter

Do you have throw blankets on the backs of the sofas and chairs? The next owner may do the exact same thing during the winter, but while showing the house, put away this evidence of the cold. Such blankets tend to be well-worn and rarely match the décor, intended for warmth while watching a movie rather than to complete a “look.”

 

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When selling a home, we try to invite potential purchasers to visualize themselves happily living in a home they visit. By making these small adjustments, you provide more dream space for your visitors. The new owners probably won’t want sheers on all the windows in the winter, but having them mounted for a showing better displays your home’s possibilities, which is just want we want.

 

 

Images used with permission, courtesy of www.bigstock.com and www.dreamstime.com