A Feng Shui Guide to Using Mirrors in Your Home

Mirrors are an easy way to bring tons of light and brightness into your home, but there’s more to mirror placement than meets the eye.

By Dan Glennzig

 

In the Chinese art of Feng Shui, there are a few design elements that are standards for any space. These include water features, candles, wind chimes, and mirrors. Mirrors in particular are a beloved Feng Shui design element, frequently used as quick and effective fixes for certain areas of a space where energy isn’t flowing as well as it could be.

 

There can always be too much of a good thing. As you explore improving the flow of positive energy throughout your home with Feng Shui, here are some tips for using mirrors in your home.

 

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What To Do

Whole Image - Try to use mirrors that are whole and new. Don’t use mirrors with mosaic effects or tiled mirrors distract from the whole image of your reflection. Cracks and antique finishes can also disrupt the flow of your room. Feng Shui experts say that these types of mirrors eventually will cause you to see yourself as cracked and aged before your time. If you place these types of mirrors near your door, you take these negative feelings with you into the world, destroying your confidence. Instead, use mirrors that show the complete you in a large, fresh image.

 

Young woman in front of a full length mirror
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Reflections - Wherever you can, use mirrors to reflect images of nature and light. Place them across from a window, indoor plants, or a framed photograph of a natural scene. Try to reflect light into darker areas, a dim-lit hallway or a small nook. Using positive reflections can that bring a fresh, living energy into your home and brighten spaces without the need for artificial lighting.

 

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Doubling - Many Feng Shui designers will place mirrors across the spaces in your home where you store money in order to "double" what you already have. It’s a way to focus energy at your money saving endeavors and promotes the growth and prosperity of your finances. You could achieve a similar effect by placing a mirror across from your dining room, which is an area that is said to represent your family’s material wealth.

 

Interior of a living room
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What Not To Do

Mirrors in Doorways - Don’t hang a mirror directly across from your front door. Whenever the door opens and fresh new Qi, or "chi," (the essential energy of a living thing) enters the home, it will bounce off the mirror and be pushed back outside. This leaves the energy in your home feeling stale and sluggish. Instead, place the mirror to one side of the door where it will catch the new energy and bounce it around in the space.

 

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Dirty Mirrors - Don’t leave your mirrors dirty. Clean them any time you see smudges or cloudiness starting to form. The reason for this is similar to the reason for not hanging antiqued mirrors. Looking at yourself in a dirty, smudged mirror begins reinforces the idea that you are not as bright, lively, and fresh as you could be. Eventually, that attitude will become internalized and sap your energy and confidence.

 

Young woman looking into dirty mirror
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Mirrors in Bedrooms - Many Feng Shui enthusiasts say that the worst place for a mirror is in the bedroom, particularly over the bed. The reason for this is that mirrors are essentially always “on”, constantly catching and reflecting energy throughout a room. To hang one in the bedroom can lead to insomnia as the daily energy that you bring with you to bed is caught and constantly reflected back to you.

 

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Strategic Reflections - Try not to reflect anything that could be considered ugly, dangerous, or negative, such as a fireplace or a utility area. Though this rule is largely aesthetic, the point of mirrors within Feng Shui is to capture only good and beautiful energy.

 

Entrance with mirror and fireplce
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Mirrors within your home can be a beautiful blessing. With these tips, you can fill your home with positive vibes in as little as an hour.



Images used with permission, courtesy of www.bigstock.com and www.dreamstime.com